3 DIY Low-Cost Root Cellar Ideas to Store Your Harvest for Year-Round Freshness

A root cellar is an age-old method of storing fruits, vegetables, and other perishable goods, allowing homesteaders and gardeners to enjoy their harvest year-round. Root cellars maintain a stable temperature and humidity, creating ideal conditions for preserving the freshness and quality of your produce. Building a root cellar does not have to be expensive or complicated.

DIY Root Cellar Ideas

In this article, we will explore three DIY low-cost root cellar ideas that you can implement to store your harvest for year-round freshness.


Buried Trash Can or Barrel Root Cellar

One of the simplest and most cost-effective root cellar ideas is repurposing a trash can or a large plastic barrel. This method requires minimal construction and is perfect for small-scale storage.

Materials:

  • Large, heavy-duty plastic can or barrel with a tight-fitting lid
  • Gravel or small rocks
  • Perforated PVC pipe (optional)
  • Shovel
  • Straw or hay (optional)

Instructions:

  1. Choose a well-drained location in your yard or garden that is partially shaded and protected from direct sunlight.
  2. Dig a hole large enough to accommodate the trash can or barrel, leaving about 4-6 inches above ground level.
  3. If you’re concerned about excess moisture or condensation, place a layer of gravel or small rocks at the bottom of the hole for drainage. Alternatively, you can also install a perforated PVC pipe vertically in the center of the hole for added ventilation.
  4. Place the trash can or barrel into the hole, ensuring that the top is slightly above ground level to prevent water from seeping in.
  5. Fill the gap around the container with soil, packing it tightly to provide insulation and stability.
  6. Place your harvested fruits and vegetables inside the container, using straw or hay to separate layers and prevent bruising.
  7. Cover the container with the tight-fitting lid and add a layer of straw or hay on top for extra insulation, if desired.

Earthbag Root Cellar

An earthbag root cellar is an eco-friendly and affordable option for those seeking a more substantial storage solution. This method involves using earth-filled bags to create a dome-shaped structure that naturally regulates temperature and humidity.

Materials:

  • Polypropylene bags or long sandbags
  • Soil or a mixture of clay, sand, and gravel
  • Shovel
  • Tamping tool
  • Barbed wire (optional)
  • Door and frame
  • Roofing material (e.g., corrugated metal, tarp)

Instructions:

  1. Choose a well-drained, partially shaded location for your root cellar. Consider digging a few feet into the ground to take advantage of the earth’s natural insulation.
  2. Mark out the desired shape and size of your root cellar, allowing for enough space to accommodate your door and storage needs.
  3. Fill the polypropylene bags or sandbags with soil or a mixture of clay, sand, and gravel. Tamp down the contents to create a solid, compact bag.
  4. Lay the bags in a circular or oval pattern, creating the first layer of your root cellar walls. If desired, add a layer of barbed wire between each course of bags to improve stability.
  5. Continue building up the walls with additional layers of bags, staggering the joints like bricks for added strength. As you build, gradually curve the walls inward to create a dome shape.
  6. Install a door and frame, ensuring a tight seal to maintain the proper temperature and humidity within the root cellar.
  7. Cover the dome with a layer of soil for insulation and top with a waterproof roofing material such as corrugated metal or a tarp.

Converted Old Refrigerator or Freezer Root Cellar

An old refrigerator or chest freezer can be repurposed into a compact and efficient root cellar. This method is not only budget-friendly but also an excellent way to recycle an old appliance.

Materials:

  • Old refrigerator or chest freezer (ensure it is CFC-free)
  • Shovel
  • Gravel or small rocks
  • Cinder blocks or bricks (optional)
  • Straw or hay (optional)
  • Hinges and latch (for chest freezer conversion)

Instructions:

  1. Choose a well-drained, partially shaded location for your root cellar.
  2. Dig a hole large enough to accommodate the refrigerator or chest freezer, leaving about 4-6 inches above ground level. If desired, you can also build a small retaining wall using cinder blocks or bricks around the hole for added stability and insulation.
  3. Place a layer of gravel or small rocks at the bottom of the hole for drainage.
  4. Carefully lower the refrigerator or chest freezer into the hole, ensuring it is level and stable.
  5. Fill the gap around the appliance with soil, packing it tightly to provide insulation and stability.
  6. If you’re using a chest freezer, you may need to replace the original hinges and latch with more robust hardware to ensure a tight seal.
  7. Place your harvested fruits and vegetables inside the refrigerator or chest freezer, using straw or hay to separate layers and prevent bruising.
  8. Close the door tightly to maintain the proper temperature and humidity within the root cellar. Add a layer of straw or hay on top for extra insulation, if desired.

Conclusion

A root cellar is an invaluable addition to any homestead or garden, providing a simple and effective way to store your harvest for year-round freshness. These three DIY low-cost root cellar ideas offer budget-friendly solutions that cater to various storage needs and can be easily implemented with minimal construction skills.

By repurposing readily available materials and harnessing the earth’s natural insulation properties, you can create a sustainable storage solution that will keep your fruits and vegetables fresh and flavorful throughout the year.

This Post Has 2 Comments

  1. Lazy K

    Bummer! All of your ideas require digging a hole in the ground. If I weren’t living on a solid rock foundation I’d go ahead and build a root seller. I was hoping for above ground solutions.

    1. Harold

      @Lazy K, without a basement or the ability to dig the options for a “root cellar” , which by its very definition is at least partially underground, your options are limited. I suppose you could bring in a large mound of soil to accomplish the goal.

      There is something called a springhouse, for those who have a natural water source on their property that can be built and functions well for this purpose. Although not many people will have that option.

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